Archive for July, 2009

Umm Ziad: A Jordanian Bedouin Karaki Christian Woman from Smakieh, Karak, Jordan

Umm Ziad Tereze Jameel Hijazeen A Christian Jordanian woman from Smakieh, Karak, Jordan

This my Aunt, Umm Ziad Torman Hijazeen. I like her very much. I have never posted a photo of hers in my Blog.

The photo above is one of the 140+ photos my friend Jackson took during his visit to Smakieh. In my opinion, it is one of the most beautiful photos.

Ironically, Jackson took this photo of my aunt just because he wanted to take a photo of what old people of Smakieh used as a light source. This lamp, which is held by my aunt, is tens of years old.

Luckily, Jackson took a photo of both my aunt and the lamp. I am really happy and proud to post this photo.

Moab: Stele from Balua, Moab, showing Moabite ruler between two deities. 12th or 11th century BC. (American Museum).

Stele%20from%20Balua%20Moab%20showing%20Moabite%20ruler%20betwe 

Source:
Moab: Stele from Balua, Moab, showing Moabite ruler between two deities. 12th or 11th century BC. (American Museum).

 

This Stele is now present in the Jordanian Arachaeological Museum in Amman. Moabite was there:

https://amanfrommoab.wordpress.com/2007/09/22/stela-of-balau-again/

The Stele of balua moab karak jordan

Stele of balua jordan karak arachaeological museum 

WordPress Tags: Moab,Stele,Balua,Moabite,ruler,American,Museum,Source,Jordanian,Arachaeological,Amman,century

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Jackson Cha: Arrived, slept, then left Smakieh

Thursday afternoon, at about 3 o’clock, I and Jackson Cha arrived at Smakieh. I brought him from the South Bus Terminal in Amman.

Jackson slept at my house for 2 days. “I will never forget Somakkieh!” Said he at almost 7 o’clock this morning on the circle of Smakieh. He pronounced the name of my village in the weirdest pronunciation I’ve ever heard. It sounded funny!

At about 7:25, we both boarded Hamideh Villages-Amman bus. He chose a single seat. I talked to HH; a policeman who was wearing the national uniform of Jordanian traffic police. I told Hussam to “take care” of Jackson.

Next, I paid the bus fee of Jackson. It now costs 1.5 JD. Yesterday, Fuel prices were raised. Next, I came back to Smakieh. Jackson Cha was generous and courageous enough to not allow me to accompany him to Amman. I explained to him that I had a hard exam on Monday.

When I arrived home, I slept till 11 o’clock. I called Jackson seconds after the Alarm Clock went off. “I am sorry I didn’t call you.” He said immediately. “I arrived 2 hours ago!” Said he. I smiled. He then told me that he is copying the images he took in Smakieh on a DVD. He said that he is going to send me a copy in a mail message.

Will the DVD work after being sent using normal mail ? I hope so! I need those photos to describe not only the visit but many future posts about Smakieh, Traditions, Customs, etc.

All in all, it was a great experience I lived the previous two days. It showed me a hidden aspect of some of Smakieh people. How shy was i to discover some facts! I will talk about this in the future.

WordPress Tags: Jackson,Smakieh,afternoon,clock,South,Terminal,Amman,Somakkieh,Said,village,pronunciation,Hamideh,Hussam,policeman,Jordanian,traffic,Fuel,exam,Alarm,images,message,Traditions,Customs,aspect,Villages,photos

A very funny post by Hareega

* David Letterman: “Anybody here from Minnesota? Congratulations, you have a brand new senator, our old friend, Al Franken. Al is an interesting guy. Went from being a comedian to politician. George Bush, the other way around.”

* Barack Obama visited Ghana. He was expecting people there to commend the US on electing a black president, but the Ghanaians said it’s no big deal. So far they have elected 12 black men to be their president

* If you’re a doctor and you have patients who wake up after a few days of being unconscious, it’s not cool to tell them it’s 2013. Sometimes they might believe you.

For the whole Post:

http://hareega.blogspot.com/2009/07/miiiikro-blogging-for-tamooz-2009-ala.html

*. I am just interested to know if blogspot.com can discoever if a certain blog is linking to your blog. Will my blog be shown in he section called:  “Links to this post”. This is my first time to try it!

One improtant thing, this entry is really very funny. I am not only testing this service by blogger.com!

Playing a Christian Song in an ‘English Village’ in Mu’tah University, Insanity?

Chris is one of four American volunteers in a governmental American organization called ‘Peace Corps’. Today, Chris gave us the 4th lecture of the English Village course in Mu’tah University.

Since less than a year, Chris lives in Smakieh, my village. “We, volunteers, don’t choose where to live! Peace Corps just choose where we live!” Chris explained to a student in Qaser-University bus today’s evening.

Today’s lecture was about English songs. It was clearly that Chris had a hard job preparing this lesson for less than 30 students who attended his three-hour lesson. How many hours did he spend preparing the lyrics, downloading the songs from the internet then to his iPod, carrying large speakers to and fro the University, standing for 3 continuous hours explaining, discussing, and interacting with Jordanian students studying in Mu’tah University! If volunteers decided to ask for money in return for their lessons, what amount of money is enough to repay them their favors?

Chris asked us, students, what songs to play. He just enumerated the songs he prepared. Then he would wait for students to decide. After the first song or two he played, he started to talk about a song he had talking about ‘Christian Song’. “Oh God!” I thought to myself. Does he really understand what he is talking about? I discovered that it was only the beginning.

He described this song as “very emotional”. It is about a “conversation between God and his son, Jesus!” I didn’t know what to say or do! Doesn’t he know that he touched the most controversial issue between Christianity and Islam? The Quran talks specifically about the ‘infidels’ who claimed that ‘God had a son’. What? Why? How? I was baffled and my face flushed instead of Chris’.

Chris just continued. He didn’t seem to care. He talked as comfortable as if he was talking about the weather. I wanted to warn him. “You should stop! This is not a topic of discussion! Christians believe that Jesus is the ‘Son of God’ and Muslims…” How could I explain all of this to him in front of all students? Will I deliver my idea correctly? Should I enter in a discussion related to a forbidden subject as “Religion”? I sat silent waiting to see a student or another raising his voice to object to Chris. “How pity is Chris! He doesn’t know much about religions in the Middle East!” I felt sorry for Chris!

Students chose the third song and ignored the idea of hearing the “very emotional Christian song”. I felt relieved! But, for not too long!

We finished the third song. It was time to choose the next song.
Again, Chris began to explain what options we had. Again, I heard him mentioning “God and his Son”. “What is the matter with him?” I thought and thought! Again, the students voted to listen to another song. I was voting with them! I surely understood why they don’t want to understand such a song! Discussing religion is like discussing Sex or Politics. Nawaal Sa’dawee نوال السعداوي , an Egyptian feminist and writer, describe those horrible and unspeakable topics in the Arab World as “Forbidden Trinity”. Choose any other topic and talk about it!

Again, we finished this song. Chris wanted to start another. It was way long before lesson ends. Again and Again, Chris offers the Christian song, and we students, choose the one of the remaining 3 then 2 options.

20 minutes prior to the end of the class, Dr. Layla Omari, a doctor in the English department of the Faculty of Arts in Mu’tah University entered our class. Since the beginning of this course on Sunday, this is the first time the Supervisor doctor attended a lecture with us.

We finished the 5th or 6th song. We were left with two songs to choose from. The first song, you name it. The other one was about ‘loving one’s country’. A fuss occurred in the class, a female student behind me whispered to Dr. Layla. I was sitting between the two. I didn’t turn my head toward them. I didn’t want to appear spying on them. In the first place, why was she whispering? She wants the subject to be classified.

I overheard the following words… “Tell him… Religion…. Religion…” Then Chris just interrupted and all the students, including this one, stopped talking. Dr. Layla nodded like she understood what the girl talked about.

It was the time to choose the last Song to hear. It was almost 5 o’clock. Students had only two options. What do you think we chose? You guess it! I smiled at how Chris insisted on describing what the Christian song talked about. I have never seen him in the Church in Smakieh. Why Christianity was so important to him then?

After the lecture, I waited till all students left. I approached Chris and was beginning to explain to him this controversial issue between Christianity and Islam. “I know!” Quickly he answered. I was shocked. “Muslims doesn’t believe that Jesus is the Son of God!” I said nothing more. It turned out that he knows! Why did he talk about it then? Is this “Bravery” or “Misjudgment”? I thought for a moment until Chris expressed his opinion!

How courageous is to have a principle in life! What is more courageous is to defend this principle! The principle might be wrong! This might be the case as trying to play a Christian song in Mu’tah. But in the end, you are defending what you believe in no matter what Moabite or others think of!

“OK, Muslims don’t believe in this… Fine! If you listen to other’s opinions, this doesn’t mean that you are accepting them! Just listen to them”

What do you think? Is Chris’s principle correct? Should you listen to an idea or opinion you definitely believe is incorrect?

Playing a Christian Song in an ‘English Village’ in Mu’tah University, Insanity?

Chris is one of four American volunteers in a governmental American organization called ‘Peace Corps’. Today, Chris gave us the 4th lecture of the English Village course in Mu’tah University.

Since less than a year, Chris lives in Smakieh, my village. “We, volunteers, don’t choose where to live! Peace Corps just choose where we live!” Chris explained to a student in Qaser-University bus today’s evening.

Today’s lecture was about English songs. It was clearly that Chris had a hard job preparing this lesson for less than 30 students who attended his three-hour lesson. How many hours did he spend preparing the lyrics, downloading the songs from the internet then to his iPod, carrying large speakers to and fro the University, standing for 3 continuous hours explaining, discussing, and interacting with Jordanian students studying in Mu’tah University! If volunteers decided to ask for money in return for their lessons, what amount of money is enough to repay them their favors?

Chris asked us, students, what songs to play. He just enumerated the songs he prepared. Then he would wait for students to decide. After the first song or two he played, he started to talk about a song he had talking about ‘Christian Song’. “Oh God!” I thought to myself. Does he really understand what he is talking about? I discovered that it was only the beginning.

He described this song as “very emotional”. It is about a “conversation between God and his son, Jesus!” I didn’t know what to say or do! Doesn’t he know that he touched the most controversial issue between Christianity and Islam? The Quran talks specifically about the ‘infidels’ who claimed that ‘God had a son’. What? Why? How? I was baffled and my face flushed instead of Chris’.

Chris just continued. He didn’t seem to care. He talked as comfortable as if he was talking about the weather. I wanted to warn him. “You should stop! This is not a topic of discussion! Christians believe that Jesus is the ‘Son of God’ and Muslims…” How could I explain all of this to him in front of all students? Will I deliver my idea correctly? Should I enter in a discussion related to a forbidden subject as “Religion”? I sat silent waiting to see a student or another raising his voice to object to Chris. “How pity is Chris! He doesn’t know much about religions in the Middle East!” I felt sorry for Chris!

Students chose the third song and ignored the idea of hearing the “very emotional Christian song”. I felt relieved! But, for not too long!

We finished the third song. It was time to choose the next song.
Again, Chris began to explain what options we had. Again, I heard him mentioning “God and his Son”. “What is the matter with him?” I thought and thought! Again, the students voted to listen to another song. I was voting with them! I surely understood why they don’t want to understand such a song! Discussing religion is like discussing Sex or Politics. Nawaal Sa’dawee نوال السعداوي , an Egyptian feminist and writer, describe those horrible and unspeakable topics in the Arab World as “Forbidden Trinity”. Choose any other topic and talk about it!

Again, we finished this song. Chris wanted to start another. It was way long before lesson ends. Again and Again, Chris offers the Christian song, and we students, choose the one of the remaining 3 then 2 options.

20 minutes prior to the end of the class, Dr. Layla Omari, a doctor in the English department of the Faculty of Arts in Mu’tah University entered our class. Since the beginning of this course on Sunday, this is the first time the Supervisor doctor attended a lecture with us.

We finished the 5th or 6th song. We were left with two songs to choose from. The first song, you name it. The other one was about ‘loving one’s country’. A fuss occurred in the class, a female student behind me whispered to Dr. Layla. I was sitting between the two. I didn’t turn my head toward them. I didn’t want to appear spying on them. In the first place, why was she whispering? She wants the subject to be classified.

I overheard the following words… “Tell him… Religion…. Religion…” Then Chris just interrupted and all the students, including this one, stopped talking. Dr. Layla nodded like she understood what the girl talked about.

It was the time to choose the last Song to hear. It was almost 5 o’clock. Students had only two options. What do you think we chose? You guess it! I smiled at how Chris insisted on describing what the Christian song talked about. I have never seen him in the Church in Smakieh. Why Christianity was so important to him then?

After the lecture, I waited till all students left. I approached Chris and was beginning to explain to him this controversial issue between Christianity and Islam. “I know!” Quickly he answered. I was shocked. “Muslims doesn’t believe that Jesus is the Son of God!” I said nothing more. It turned out that he knows! Why did he talk about it then? Is this “Bravery” or “Misjudgment”? I thought for a moment until Chris expressed his opinion!

How courageous is to have a principle in life! What is more courageous is to defend this principle! The principle might be wrong! This might be the case as trying to play a Christian song in Mu’tah. But in the end, you are defending what you believe in no matter what Moabite or others think of!

“OK, Muslims don’t believe in this… Fine! If you listen to other’s opinions, this doesn’t mean that you are accepting them! Just listen to them”

What do you think? Is Chris’s principle correct? Should you listen to an idea or opinion you definitely believe is incorrect?

The Sound of Harmony Band of Boston is performing in Karak, Jordan

The above band is supposedly to perform in Karak this evening. I read an Ad in Alghad newspaper yesterday evening. This activity is one of the very first activities of the Jordan Vestival. They specified the date but not the time.

I searched in google news… I searched in Jordanian Newspapers websites but never found an answer. The best I could find was in Alrai newspaper. It only confirmed to me that the event will be held today’s evening in Marj, Karak. But when?

Today’s morning, before 8 o’clcok, No Ad was hanged on the north gate of Mu’tah university. Where can I find the timing? Please…

I will call a friend of mine (Mazen Kh) to inquire;  he lives in Marj. maybe he saw an Ad on his way to university.

If it turned out that I have no exam tomorrow, I will make sure to attend this event held by this American band.

Googling the name of this band gave me no clear results. Either the name is wrong, or, maybe the band is not very famous. Will a famous and very prestigous band agree to perform in a small place like Karak?

Since I put the name of this band as the title of my post, will this post appear in google search engine when a person want to get information about this mysterious band? Will my post be one of the top 10 results?

Lets wait and see… In the mean time, dear reader, if you arrived to my blog through google after searching for “The Sound of Harmony Band!” Can you publish this interesting information in the “comment” section below… Thanks!

Rachel Cleary: “This word is so bad that I haven’t proably said it in my life!”

What kind of word that my English teacher couldn’t have ‘probably’ said in her life? I and the students in the English village class in Mu’tah university were amazed at how intense, emotional, and almost agressive our English teacher, Miss Rachel Cleary became. But what was said that bothere her?

A student started a questoin, with a modest English, saying, “Negro!” The teacher didn’t give herself nor us a time to understand what the question is about. She just answered him very quickly and strongly. I couldn’t imagine how a smily, jolly, and joking person can become furious as she was. Women!

“This is the worst word in English language!” She stated confidently. Wow! I didn’t know that such a word is that bad. She continued only not to let anyperson have the chance to think of the innocence of this word against the charges against it. To prove her point of view, she only asked a question. She is smart to have asked such a question. When you put yourself in other’s places, you can understand what they feel. When teacher rachel asked that question, I could understand what she thought about this word. She asked:

“What is the most horrible Arabic word?”

She gave us little time to think. Later in my house, it took me minutes to think of an answer. She then said only to deliver her idea effectively and strongly, “Negro is like this most horrible Arabic word!” Wow! How could she come with such a comparison? Again, “Women”!

The most horrible Arabic word in my opinion could be “Infidel”. I hate this word because it is a sterotype against those not following a certain religion. As Negro is sterotyping against a human beingjust because of the color of his skin, an infidel sterotype against a human beings for freely choosing his religion!

English Village in Mu’tah University Started on Sunday

I met 2 Amreican volunteers till now. The man, named Adam, is a unique person. He is the kind of of teacher you will remeber till the end of your life.

I was surprised to know that there were Iraqi Kurdish students studying in Mu’tah university. Four are part of the English village.

Today, Chris is gonnna give us his first lecture. Will he be as shy as he is in public buses? Will he be as confident and funny as Adam is? Will he be as courageous as Rachel was in front of the angry doctor who wanted to get us out of the classroom? Will he control the lesson strongly as both Adam and Rachel did?

A guy told me that Rachel is married to a Tarawneh man. Really? If so, I wonder what personality doles this person have that he was able to make an American women, of different culture and different standard, to fill in love with him?!

Who is to be blamed more on poverty, governments or individuals? My opinion was that it depends on what country that individual lives in. If he is a hardworking person but lives in a country where there are no jobs, and if there are jobs, they generate low salaries, then the blame is not his but on his country. Don’t you think that my opinion is correct?